FAQs

FAQs

Please see our frequently asked questions below.
Q. What is this issue about?

 

 

The Joint Operating Agreement (JOA) is an important agreement which will set the foundation for how the CCAs and the Park Board move forward in partnership for the next 15 years.

It is crucial that a JOA is developed that meets the needs of the Park Board and the unique communities that the CCAs serve.

Currently, the areas of concern in the JOA are:
• Dispute resolution process
• Membership
• Financial costs
• Provisions for termination of the relationship
• Association governance and autonomy

Q. Why isn’t the Park Board listening to your feedback and input?

We can’t speak for the Park Board.

What we can tell you is that we are hopeful that they will take our feedback and input seriously as we move forward with this JOA. We bring decades of knowledge, expertise and experience in successfully running community centres to the table. We strongly believe that our feedback and input is crucial in developing a JOA that meets the needs of the Park Board and each of our diverse communities.

Q. Why won’t Park Board Commissioners meet with CCAs to resolve this matter?

Commissioners have been told by Park Board staff that it goes against their fiduciary duty to meet with CCAs regarding the JOA. We disagree. We feel that meeting with constituents is an essential role of any elected official. We hope that the Commissioners will sit down with us and listen to our ideas about resolving this issue and develop a JOA that works for the Park Board and each of our communities.

Q. The Joint Operating Agreement is an “agreement.” Doesn’t that mean that this is a negotiation?

At the start of this process, we were informed by the Park Board that this is not a negotiation. In May, 2016, the Park Board announced “The New Way Forward” – a consultation process designed to achieve a new JOA by fall 2016.

Q. Was consultation undertaken to come to the current draft JOA?

 

 

While “The New Way Forward” was defined as a consultation model, we don’t feel that it was truly consultative.

We were told from the beginning of this process that the Park Board would only be selecting feedback that “made sense” to them to include in the final proposal.

When the group of CCAs came together to come to a consensus on a proposal that we felt would work for both the Park Board and our organizations, Park Board staff told us that they were not interested in a consensus, only in individual responses.

We have not been informed as to why the recommendations that we spent hundreds of hours developing could not be included in the JOA. There has been no communication with us regarding the thoughtful, detailed proposal that we submitted – in good faith – to the Park Board in November 2016. Several Park Board Commissioners have told us they had not read this document.

We feel strongly that the issues that are essential to us have not been addressed in this final proposal.

 

 

Q. What is it that the CCAs want in the JOA?

 

 

We believe that the CCAs and the Park Board want a JOA that works equally well for the Park Board and for each of our distinct communities. It is crucial that several areas of concern are addressed in the JOA before we can, in good faith, go to our respective boards of directors and our communities and recommend signing this agreement. The areas of concern are:
• Dispute resolution process
• Membership
• Financial costs
• Provisions for termination of the relationship
• Association governance and autonomy

Q. This has been a long process – why can’t the CCAs and the Park Board come to an agreement?

This is an important document – the JOA defines our partnership with the Park Board for the next 15 years. We are committed to getting an agreement that meets the needs of our communities – and we don’t feel that we are being unreasonable in what we expect to be included in this document.

Volunteer representatives from the CCAs came together over several months – and spent hundreds of hours – to draft a proposal that we submitted to the Park Board in early November. At that time, we informed the Park Board that we were united in supporting the content of this document. Unfortunately, the current draft of the JOA does not address or resolve the issues that we identified.

Q. Why won’t the Park Board agree to what you want included in the JOA?

We can’t speak for the Park Board. We have asked the Park Board staff and Commissioners why our recommendations have not been included, but we have not yet received a response that clearly answers this question.

Q. What are non-negotiable points for you regarding the JOA?

We continue to have several areas of concern in the JOA, they are:
• Dispute resolution process
• Membership
• Financial costs
• Provisions for termination of the relationship
• Association governance and autonomy

These areas need to be addressed in the JOA before we can recommend to our respective boards of directors that the agreement be signed.

Q. What are the next steps?

Each of the CCAs in this group is reaching out to our identified Park Board Commissioners. We want to provide them with information on what we need to sign the JOA and to request a meeting for a fulsome discussion on how we can work together and move forward on developing a JOA that meets the needs of the Park Board and the CCAs.

Q. What happens if you can’t come to an agreement?

We are hopeful that our CCA representatives can have a productive dialogue with the Commissioners, who are elected to work for and protect the needs of the residents of our communities. We want to provide them with the information and context necessary so that they can understand the importance of the key concerns we have regarding this JOA.

We are asking the Commissioners to send the JOA back to Park Board staff, to meet with the CCAs, and to incorporate the CCA feedback into the document.

Q. There is a rocky history between the CCAs and the Park Board – is this influencing this situation?

We are committed to rebuilding the trust that has been lost between the Park Board and our communities. While we are concerned that this JOA consultation has continued to erode trust, we are hopeful that the Commissioners will work with us. We want to focus on the goal of developing a JOA that works for both parties, and we believe that this will be a positive start to support a rebuilding of trust within the relationship between the CCAs and the Park Board.

Q. What happened with the lawsuit filed by six CCAs?

The lawsuit is currently on hold while we work to get a JOA that works for the Park Board and the CCAs.